Archives: BOP-CCERS Professional Development

7 Reasons to Get Excited about Plankton!

There’s an amazing microscopic world in every drop of New York Harbor water.  Fancy equipment helps, but you can even spot these key players in the harbor ecosystem using DIY materials! “Plankton” is a catch-all term for an extremely diverse range of species that share one trait: they live in the water column and are unable to […]

Getting the Right Environmental Data into the Classroom

BOP students do hands-on environmental monitoring of their Oyster Restoration Stations at least four times a year.  But what do you do with that data once you have it? This February, public school teachers from all over New York City attended our professional development, “Data Analysis for Teachers, Part 1: Getting the right environmental data […]

How Can Design Change Our City’s Waterfront for the Better- and How Can You Get Involved?

Collaboration between landscape designers, architects, scientists, environmental activists, curators, and the public- rather than a top-down approach- is key to envisioning a more resilient New York City. Art and design can play a key role in helping us imagine the New York City we want- and it’s up to all of us to shape this […]

Build Your Classroom Library!

Between “Google it!” and “turn to page 55 of your textbook,” lives a rich but accessible middle ground: classroom and topic libraries.  While we’re fostering technical literacy for middle school students through the BOP Digital Platform as a part of the Billion Oyster Project Curriculum and Community Enterprise for Restoration Science (BOP-CCERS), we believe that print isn’t […]

Preparing Students to do Original Research, Part 2: How To Work with Data from the BOP Digital Platform

As participants in the Billion Oyster Project Curriculum and Community Enterprise for Restoration Science (BOP-CCERS), BOP students go beyond monitoring their Oyster Restoration Stations (ORS)– they also design, conduct, and present an original research project based on their restoration experiences at the Annual Billion Oyster Project Research Symposium.  But as teachers know, it’s no easy […]

What’s Under New York Harbor?

One of the best parts of an Oyster Restoration Station (ORS) monitoring expedition is that the mysterious murky world of New York Harbor becomes visible and tangible.  Even without pollution, our naturally sediment-laden waterways wouldn’t be crystal clear, so observers at the water’s edge have to look very closely to see any life at all.  When BOP students investigate the mobile trap and […]

Preparing Students to do Original Research, Part 1: Experimental Classroom Tanks

In this post: how to follow up on student questions in an inquiry-based classroom, how students can set up experimental oyster tanks of their own design, teachers’ thoughts on the best ways for students to research their own questions, how to build a DIY aquarium filter As participants in the Billion Oyster Project Curriculum and Community Enterprise […]

Why Do Oysters Live in Snot?  Honoring Students’ Questions in an Inquiry-Based Classroom

The CCERS Fellowship at Pace is a two‐year professional development program that trains teachers to engage their students in hands‐on environmental STEM and restoration ecology in New York Harbor.  The Fellowship is open to NYC Department of Education middle school teachers working in Title I funded schools.  Classes and trainings are taught by guest experts, […]

April Colloquium Recap: Water Chemistry

The CCERS Fellowship at Pace is a two‐year professional development program that trains teachers to engage their students in hands‐on environmental STEM and restoration ecology in New York Harbor.  The Fellowship is open to NYC Department of Education middle school teachers working in Title I funded schools.  Classes and trainings are taught by guest experts, […]

BOP-CCERS Fellows Field Training #1 at The River Project

The BOP-CCERS Fellowship at Pace University is a two-year professional development and training program designed to give teachers the knowledge and tools to engage their students in hands-on restoration science in New York Harbor.  This is our second year of the program, and the first year in which we have two cohorts overlapping. The program is […]